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Notice to Owner (Sample)

The notice to owner form that sub contractors use to tell the owner they are doing work on the project

WARNING TO OWNER: UNDER FLORIDA LAW, YOUR FAILURE TO MAKE SURE THAT WE ARE PAID MAY RESULT IN A LIEN AGAINST YOUR PROPERTY AND YOUR PAYING TWICE. TO AVOID A LIEN AND PAYING TWICE, YOU MUST OBTAIN A WRITTEN RELEASE FROM US EVERY TIME YOU PAY YOUR CONTRACTOR.

NOTICE TO OWNER


Date: _________________

TO: OWNER

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____________________________

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Cert. Mail #___________________ ____________________________

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Cert. Mail #___________________

The undersigned hereby informs you that it has furnished or is furnishing services or materials as follows:


For improvement of the real property described as:


Under an order given by:

Florida law prescribes the serving of this Notice and restricts your right to make payments under your contract in accordance with Section 713.06 Florida Statutes. Pursuant to Fla. Stat. 713.16(1) please furnish a copy of your direct contract with the contractor. Responsibility for copy costs is acknowledged.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR YOUR PROTECTION

Under Florida's law, those who work on your property or provide materials and are not paid have a right to enforce their claim for payment against your property. This claim is known as a construction lien.

If your contractor fails to pay subcontractors or material suppliers or neglects to make other legally required payments, the people who are owed money may look to your property for payment, EVEN IF YOU HAVE PAID YOUR CONTRACTOR IN FULL.

PROTECT YOURSELF:

RECOGNIZE that this Notice to Owner may result in a lien against your property unless all those supplying a Notice to Owner have been paid.

LEARN more about the Construction Lien Law, Chapter 713, Part I, Florida Statutes, and the meaning of this notice by contacting an attorney or the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation.